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Royal tiger enfield mk4 no 1 grade b review







Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#21
Update I had some 7.62x54r bullets lying around and let one drop down the bore and gets stuck only about 2 inches in does this mean there is enough rifling left to bother counterboring ?
I know they are different rounds but from my research they are the same diameter?
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Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#22
Update....finally got out today to shoot it. While it hits point of aim for the most part at 75 feet...it keyholes like a mother... But I think a 3- 4 inch counter bore would get this to stop keyholing since rifling is there and more noticeable after shooting 5 rounds through it...
Fifth round not there because I shot without aiming just to make sure incase the thing had a catastrophic failure it wouldn't be in my face.
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Dr. Marneaus

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#23
Update....finally got out today to shoot it. While it hits point of aim for the most part at 75 feet...it keyholes like a mother... But I think a 3- 4 inch counter bore would get this to stop keyholing since rifling is there and more noticeable after shooting 5 rounds through it...
Fifth round not there because I shot without aiming just to make sure incase the thing had a catastrophic failure it wouldn't be in my face.
View attachment 87914
At least it is a consistent perfect 90° tumble at that distance. You just need to measure out to what distance they make the rest of the 270° tumble and they’ll be pointed straight again LOL
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#24
If you counter bore it, I suggest using a drill of the correct diameter for one of the available barrel liners, that way if the counter bore doesn't solve the key holing, you are already part way there to relining the barrel.

With the drill bit welded to an extension, you could then drill the bore all the way out, and using Loc Tite® #620, you could install the liner your self. No need to solder it. Or use Acraglass epoxy, but Loc Tite® # 620 will work just fine.

Then all that would be left would be to cut the chamber and extractor groove, and square off and crown the muzzle, that you could get done by any competent gunsmith for around $100 or so.

Just involves running the proper chambering reamer into the newly relined barrel, and you could crown it yourself in one of several ways.

Cutting the extractor groove with the barrel still in the receiver can be a bit tricky, that's best left to a gunsmith who knows how.

With the barrel off the receiver, you could do it yourself with needle files, takes a while, but easily doable.
 

Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#25
If you counter bore it, I suggest using a drill of the correct diameter for one of the available barrel liners, that way if the counter bore doesn't solve the key holing, you are already part way there to relining the barrel.

With the drill bit welded to an extension, you could then drill the bore all the way out, and using Loc Tite® #620, you could install the liner your self. No need to solder it. Or use Acraglass epoxy, but Loc Tite® # 620 will work just fine.

Then all that would be left would be to cut the chamber and extractor groove, and square off and crown the muzzle, that you could get done by any competent gunsmith for around $100 or so.

Just involves running the proper chambering reamer into the newly relined barrel, and you could crown it yourself in one of several ways.

Cutting the extractor groove with the barrel still in the receiver can be a bit tricky, that's best left to a gunsmith who knows how.

With the barrel off the receiver, you could do it yourself with needle files, takes a while, but easily doable.
This is the kinda stuff I'm never comfortable doing because I usually tend to screw stuff up the 1st time before i get it down and I'd rather not screw this up so eventually I'll see if I can find someone to do the counterbore and then possibly look into the liner as you said if it doesn't stop the keyholing
 

MAC702

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#26
I have a No. 4 Mk. I that keyholes with certain ammo, but is actually quite accurate with other ammo. I have some S&B 150gr FMJ that it loves, and it placed well in a ViMBAR match a few years ago when it was my only Enfield.

But I bought a case of cheap Wolf 175gr FMJ and got perfect keyholes at 100 yds and all over the berm. I thought it was the ammo. But then it shot well out of my No. 5.

So I did more testing in the No. 4 and it will also keyhole with other ammo, but again quite accurate with some other reloads I did with a 150gr SP bullet. I now have a good supply of Sierra 174gr MK bullets, but haven't tested them yet, as I have better Enfields now anyway. I'm also thinking the bullet weight is the deciding factor for this rifle.

This was one of the "dark bore" rifles that Wideners was selling about ten years ago.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#27
The higher the velocity, the slower twist is required. The lower the velocity, the faster twist is required.

Since velocity and projectile weight (and to some extent projectile length) go hand in hand, and the Enfields had as I recall a 1 in 10" twist, developed for the original 215 Grain round nose bullet, I can see where different loads (projectile weight, length, velocity wise) could be more accurate or less accurate in the same gun, and also in another gun of the same caliber with the same twist rate, where one bore is in better shape than the other at critical points in the bullet's path.
Those being the area of the bore just forward of the throat / leade where the bullet first upsets into the rifling, and the last bit of bore at the muzzle, and of course the crown also affects accuracy.

Also, the base of the bullet, and the bullet's balance point will affect accuracy and keyholing as well, the nose of the bullet, not so much.