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Looking for someone to repair cracked m44 stock.







Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#1
Does anyone here have the know how to fix a large crack in this rifle stock? Or is it even worth trying? The butt of the stock also has two horizontal cracks that are shallow and do not run all the way through but those im not worried about its the large one shown in the photos starting from the rear tang area/wrist.

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Fogie

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#2
M44? ...at first I thought the cyanide coyote-killer. Had to google the gun.
Quick google showed lots of stocks for sale, surplus take-off and aftermarket cool....good luck
 

Bumper

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#5
You might want to try a DIY repair yourself, reasonably easy to do.

First with padding to protect wood, use screw clamps to make sure you can squeeze the cracks back together. If that works you're in business.

1) Use mold release (Vaseline will do) and put a light coating on either side of crack in all exposed areas (not needed inside of stock as you can remove excess epoxy with Dremel etc.). Don't get any release agent in the crack itself.

2) Get some syringes with industrial (blunt) needles like these: syringe/needle

3) And some epoxy glue (not the really quick setting stuff) typically the longer setting stuff is stronger and, of course, gives you longer to get things clamped up.

The procedure is to apply mold release. Inject epoxy into cracks as deeply as possible. When you clamp the wood together, the epoxy will squeeze out, and inward too. Make sure you have enough epoxy injected so it fills crack when clamped.
 

Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#6
You might want to try a DIY repair yourself, reasonably easy to do.

First with padding to protect wood, use screw clamps to make sure you can squeeze the cracks back together. If that works you're in business.

1) Use mold release (Vaseline will do) and put a light coating on either side of crack in all exposed areas (not needed inside of stock as you can remove excess epoxy with Dremel etc.). Don't get any release agent in the crack itself.

2) Get some syringes with industrial (blunt) needles like these: syringe/needle

3) And some epoxy glue (not the really quick setting stuff) typically the longer setting stuff is stronger and, of course, gives you longer to get things clamped up.

The procedure is to apply mold release. Inject epoxy into cracks as deeply as possible. When you clamp the wood together, the epoxy will squeeze out, and inward too. Make sure you have enough epoxy injected so it fills crack when clamped.
I was thinking of doing something like this but since this crack is pretty severe I was thinking of reinforcing it with some threaded rod or something similar but this is not something I'm completely comfortable doing myself.
 

Coup d'etat

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#7
A two-part slow curing clear epoxy would do the trick. After gluing you have to put the stock in an adjustable wood vise and clamp it down as it cures. Once cured you can trim off excess epoxy with a sharp knife, file, or sand paper.
The epoxy once cured will be stronger than the original surrounding wood and it will never crack in the exact place again.

Coup
 
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Coup d'etat

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#8
That crack/ split in the butt is from the butt plate screw. Remove the butt plate and screws. Inject epoxy into the crack and screw hole and clamp it.
Once cured you will have to re-drill the screw hole with an appropriate sized drill bit.
 

Bumper

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#9
One of the repairs I did using the above method was on a 12 string guitar neck, i.e. under a lot of tension. The repair has held for over 20 years now. What Coup said is quite true, the repair will be stronger than the wood. I would not detract from the appearance but using screws.

A wood vise is nice to have but not necessary. You can make wood pads for your clamps, I find "vice grip" style C clamps to be especially useful:

https://www.amazon.com/Tools-VISE-G...keywords=C+clamp+pliers&qid=1613492756&sr=8-3
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#13
Rubber surgical tubing is the gunsmith's go to for clamping broken stock repairs, as the glue won't stick to it.
Start the wrap by crossing over one end of the tubing with the first wrap, and finish by tucking the end under the last wrap.
Pull / stretch the tubing as far as you can with each wrap, this will clamp things together "goodentite".
If you can't find surgical rubber tubing anymore, try Home Depot in the plumbing department. I got a 10 foot piece there for about $4 a few months ago, medical supply houses no longer carry it, just the clear polyvinyl stuff.
What you want is the yellowish latex rubber tubbing with the thick walls, like you find on a Wrist Rocket® Slingshot.
 

Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#14
So here's my attempt at fixing this crack with solely titebond 3 and a crap ton of padded clamps. The rear tang area and end of the crack came out nice as the wood is nice and flush there and looks to have bonded nicely...the middle of the crack I have some doubts as I couldn't get the wood to mate 100% flush no matter how hard I clamped there is very small lip where the top wood overlaps the bottom portion. Hopefully this repair holds if not I'll probably look into getting it pinned and be done with it.

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Coup d'etat

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#16
That lip can be filed down (wood file or steel file doesn't matter) and you can stain that area to match the surrounding wood. Wouldn't be as noticeable then.
 

Marcus2492

Reefing and Guns
#17
That lip can be filed down (wood file or steel file doesn't matter) and you can stain that area to match the surrounding wood. Wouldn't be as noticeable then.
That crossed my mind but I'm gonna go shoot 40 rounds through it and if it holds I'll probably do file it down smooth