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How to cut a magazine tube spring?







#1
Added a Nordic +2 extension for my Beretta 1301. It came with extra length mag tube spring, to be tuned by cutting to length.

Sooo... what do I cut the spring with? There a tool for something like that, or maybe just use a saw?
 
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MAC702

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#2
Diagonal cutters (dikes) or a linesman pliers (Klein is popular brand). They should be rated for cutting steel wire. Don't use an electrical stripper/cutter which are for cutting softer wires. The ones you use will probably be an anvil type of cutter, not a bypass (scissors) type. I used my Klein's for cutting my Nordic spring.
 
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NYECOGunsmith

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#4
As Mac said, make sure the diagonal cutters are rated for hardened (often referred to as Music Wire, or Spring Steel) wire, otherwise it won't cut it and will damage the cutters.

Another way to go about it is to use a Dremel ® tool and a cut off wheel, leaves a nice square end to the cut spring if you can hang on to the spring securely while cutting. The diagonals tend to leave a knife edge on the spring that requires dressing with a grinder, stone or Dremel® wheel.

No matter how you go about it, be sure to wear eye protection!
If you use the Diagonal cutters, I always get set to cut the spring, then drop a shop cloth over my hands before cutting.
That keeps flying pieces of spring from going everywhere, like into your face.
 

SixshooterSam

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#6
As Mac said, make sure the diagonal cutters are rated for hardened (often referred to as Music Wire, or Spring Steel) wire, otherwise it won't cut it and will damage the cutters.

Another way to go about it is to use a Dremel ® tool and a cut off wheel, leaves a nice square end to the cut spring if you can hand on to the spring securely while cutting. The diagonals tend to leave a knife edge on the spring that requires dressing with a grinder, stone or Dremel® wheel.

No matter how you go about it, be sure to wear eye protection!
If you use the Diagonal cutters, I always get set to cut the spring, then drop a shop cloth over my hands before cutting.
That keeps flying pieces of spring from going everywhere, like into your face.
Why not oxy-acetylene? Leave a nice rounded ball end to it, no dressing required.
 

NYECOGunsmith

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#7
Why not oxy-acetylene? Leave a nice rounded ball end to it, no dressing required.
Well, if you used a jewellers micro torch, I suppose. But otherwise the cutting zone would be pretty big, and of course you would take the temper out of the end of the spring.
 

SixshooterSam

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#8
Well, if you used a jewellers micro torch, I suppose. But otherwise the cutting zone would be pretty big, and of course you would take the temper out of the end of the spring.
You're taking the fun out of it! We used to lower cars by heating the springs up with a torch until they start to settle!
 

SixshooterSam

What, me conspiracy?
#10
I remember that being done when I was a kid back in the 50's.
Well I can neither confirm nor deny this now, but it's rumored that this practice may have been alive and well when I just happened to own my first car in the late '90s, and someone in town may or may not have offered such services for $20. But like I said, I can neither confirm nor deny that now, it's been too long, my memory is hazy.